It’s okay to be a bit weird…

different

 

So in keeping with the recent #FAFE theme , I thought I’d repost my blog on being scared about standing out and being different.

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The first day of school, college or university is always accompanied by a mixture of nervous excitement and mild panic. In my case, each of these milestone events come with an added issue to stress about: ‘How would my name be prounounced this time?!’

If you are like me, you are one of those fortunate souls with a name (or perhaps multiple) that finds itself being mispronounced frequently. The name may make perfect logical sense in your family’s ethnic language, culture or religion, yet as it journeys through the English language, its pronunciation appears to get left behind.

Before my name was called in the register, there would always be a pause before the teacher or lecturer made a hesitant attempt at ‘Ananya’. Some others however, decided they were not going to even try to pronounce it and instead asked whether I had another name I preferred to be called. Thus was born an English equivalent nickname, ‘Ana’, that has stuck with me throughout most of my life. Most Indians or at least Bengalis have 2 names: a ‘good’ name (Ananya) for official documentation and a ‘dahk’ or ‘affectionate nickname’ used by friends and family. ‘Ana’ became my ‘English Dahk’ name alongside my other Bengali nicknames.

I used to go through a phase of just switching topic when anyone asked about the real pronunciation. Some were persistent and would seek out a fellow Indian in the hope of finding out my ‘real name’. Triumphantly they would proclaim they had discovered the ‘Indian way’ of saying it. However, India is a country of numerous cultures, traditions and languages. Hindi may be universally spoken but different Indian states have separate principal languages. Within these, diverse variations in dialect can also be noticed, depending on geographical location. This means that ‘Ananya’ in Hindi is pronounced much like the modified English version, only with a few softer syllables: ‘Ah-naan-ee-yah’, which is noticeably different to the Bengali pronunciation.

It is interesting that even non-Bengalis, living in an area of West Bengal (where Bengali or Bangla can be heard predominantly) will pronounce ‘Ananya’ as ‘Ah-naan-ee-yah’. Not that it bothers me. I have become accustomed to hearing variations of my name. In fact, I like to make note of the most original attempts: ‘Ah-nigh-ah’ has maintained its first place position for a number of years now, whilst the National Health Service tried to record my name as ‘Anan Ya’. To this day, however, my dentist still tries to call me ‘Anya’…

Maturity has revealed the core issue at play at adopting ‘Ana’ over ‘Ananya’. I wanted to be like my peers and therefore shied away from my full name, assumed ‘Ana’ instead and consequently the name has stuck. Yet as I have gotten older, I have come to realise that each and every one of us has quirks that make us different: misplacing items hours after being purchased, adding cheese to every meal (!), obsessing about Canadian popstars – sound familiar?! These traits are for celebrating not being ashamed of. What is it about yourself that makes you different?

Mine? So, what is my name, really?
Ananya, pronounced in Bengali as ‘O-non-nah’ (O as in ‘lot’) meaning ‘unique’, or ‘like no other’, in Sanskrit.

So today I ask, is there anything about yourself that you have been hiding or shying away from? Instead of shying away, can you embrace this about yourself and be proud? After all, without these qualities, positive or negative, we would not be who we are today, the same as everyone else– we would not be unique.

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Highlights from August 2013

 

The Asian Destination Links

Follow The Asian Destination on Twitter: @theasiand

‘Like’ us on Facebook: facebook.com/theasiandestination

Follow us on Instagram: @theasiandestination

The Asian Destination Links

Follow The Asian Destination on Twitter: @theasiand

‘Like’ us on Facebook: facebook.com/theasiandestination

Follow us on Instagram: @theasiandestination

The 3 Things To Be Successful…Happy Friday! xo

If you haven’t seen this yet here’s your Friday treat:

 

Happy Raksha Bandhan

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A very happy Rakhsha Bandhan or Rakhi Purnima (in Bengali)!

Today is the day sisters tie the sacred thread or rakhion their brother’s wrist to symbolise her love for him whilst in return he pledges to protect his sister.

These days Raksha Bandhan is a day where brothers and sisters feed each other sweets (yes, yet anotherexcuse to eat!) and basically celebrate the kinship between siblings.

Rakhi Purnima, does now however exclude only children, like myself. As most of you know, I’m the subcontinent, cousins/close friends are usually recognised as brothers and sisters too. In fact, as well as tying rakhis on my male cousins, I would also end up tying them on my other cherished male relatives: my grandfathers and my uncles.

So today: Whether you are Indian or not, an only child or one of many:
Be grateful for your siblings. Not just those that you are related to, for we are all one. We, as people, are the same: we breathe the same air, we share the same biology and fundamentally, we all have a desire to love and be loved.
Extend a Rakhi, the bond of protection to allyour brothers and sisters today. You may realise you have more siblings than you once thought!

Happy Raksha Bandhan to all!
With love,
The Asian Destination xo

Are you monkeying around?

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It’s important to sometimes stop and take a moment to just watch the world go by. Other times however, we spend too long daydreaming, monkeying around, planning what we should be doing but not actually doing it!

So today: Are you monkeying around? Stop. Take in the moment and then take action!